anthropology, Catholic Church, democracy, Democracy and Justice, Ethics, Ethnic Minorities, Freedom, Islam, Islam and Christianity, Malaysia, Muslims, Politics, Religion, Singapore, Southeast Asia

The “Allah” case in Malaysia

 

Paint bomb against the Virgin Mary in Kota Tinggi

 

Recently Malaysia has been at the centre of another controversy. After the fatwa against Yoga (in which it was suggested that Muslims were better to abstain from it), the sentence against Kartika Sari Dewi Shukarno (who was condemned to strokes of an “Islamic” cane), and the severed cow heads left on an area awaiting the construction of a Hindu temple, today churches, and other non-Muslim places of worship, have been torched over the issue of whether non-Malay Muslims, and in particular Christians, can use the word ‘Allah’. The Malay government, controlled by UMNO, clearly supports the opinion that “Allah” is, at least linguistically, a Malay Muslim theo-semiotic possession, despite the word being Arabic. Yet to understand the present situation we need to look at how Muslim Malaysians make sense of their social political identity within the country. Continue reading

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