Academia, anthropology, Ethnic Minorities, Gender, Islam, Muslim family, Muslims, Politics, Singapore, sociology, Southeast Asia

Singaporean Malay teen girls from disadvantaged backgrounds: between feelings of unfulfillable responsibility and self-stereotypes?

During my 3 years of research in Singapore, as part of a wider research on Malay youth in Singapore, I studied the social identity formation of Malay teen Muslim girls from socially and economically disadvantaged families. Methodologically, not only have I conducted in-depth interviews but also, thanks to organizations such as Clubilya, 4PM and Petrapis, had the opportunity to engage in participant observation of several group activities involving these girls. Facebook has furthermore provided a level of access that years before would have been imaginable to an anthropologist studying youth. Continue reading

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Academia, anthropology, Islam, marranci, Middle East, Muslims, Research Metodology, sociology, University

Introducing Twitter-Lectures

Dear all,
A couple of flus and packing my home to move back to Australia (more information later) made my blog inactive. Yet I will post something soon.
Today I wish to announce a new idea. I have started some twitter-lectures: a short number of tweets discussing a specific topic and then opening the topic to debate. 
You can follow my tweet-lectures and discuss them @AnthroLectures or#AnthroLectures  Please, feel free to contribute.
Yours
Gabriele

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America, anthropology, Arab-Israeli conflict, Democracy and Justice, Ethnic Minorities, Europe, Freedom, Islam, Israel, Israel/Palestine, Middle East, Muslims, Neocon, Politics, Refugees, Research, sociology, War

The Palestinian UN statehood bid and the ideology of dystopia

To write about the Middle East is always difficult, but to write about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is even more so. Emotions, religious fanaticism and global geopolitical interests make this region the trap of many commentators, journalists and academics whom wish to propose ‘the best solution’. Analysis seems to be the only refuge. Continue reading

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anthropology, Apocalypse, bin-Laden, Bush, democracy, Democracy and Justice, Ethics, Freedom, Iraq, Islam, Islam and Christianity, Islamo Fascism, Islamophobia, jihad, Journalism, Misteries, Muslim family, Muslims, Neocon, Politics, Religion, sociology, Terrorism, The UK, Uk government, War, War on Terror

9/11 commemorations: ritualizing and celebrating civilization rhetoric

Yesterday the tenth anniversary of 9/11 was commemorated in New York. Yet the commemorations started more than one week in advance with newspapers, TVs and magazine building up the momentum. There is little need to summarize the incredible amount of special dossiers, reports, commentaries and documentaries which have been written during these days for a tragedy that happened ten years ago. The commemoration of 9/11 is becoming increasingly interactive with questions like: “do you remember 9/11?” or “share your 9/11” and similar collective archiving of personal memories, often shared every year for the past decade. Continue reading

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Africa, anthropology, democracy, Democracy and Justice, Ethnic Minorities, Europe, Freedom, Immigration, Islam, Italy, jihad, Journalism, Muslims, Politics, Refugees, Research, Terrorism, The UK, War, War on Terror

The danger of being black in a formerly green country: new Libya, old racism

“Hey Abid, why are you here? Do not take anything, okay? I know what your people do.” Aimed towards the ears of a black man whom had just entered, the hoarse voice of Lamin echoed throughout the mosque. The black worshiper left. I turned towards Lamin, an elderly Libyan migrant from Misrata whom I had met recently. I asked if he knew the man whom just left. He replied “no, I do not know him, but I know his people.” I was confused why he called him ‘Abid’. To my natural question of how he knew the man’s name, he replied “all of us in Misrata call blacks Abid. They are fake Libyans, since we are white Arabs. All these Abid are criminals: they steal everything, our jobs, our homes and even lands because Gaddafi likes them”. Abid was a nickname charged with a painful reference to the dark history of slavery, so common in the history of Mediterranean countries. In Libya, the slave trade continued at least until the 1930s, although some cases can still be documented today. Indeed Abid means slave. Continue reading

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Afghanistan, America, anthropology, bin-Laden, democracy, Europe, Freedom, Iraq, Islam, Italy, jihad, Journalism, Muslims, Politics, Refugees, Sunni, Terrorism, The UK, War, War on Terror

Repeating the same mistakes? The Libyan revolution, tribes and the risk of Afghanistization

A tiger cannot change its stripes, nor a leopard its spots, so too have the US, UK, France and Italy appeared to have not learnt very much from previous disastrous interventions within Muslim societies and nations. The revolution in Libya is more complex than a majority of mass media reports, both in the US and Europe, suggest. After an attentive survey of newspaper articles and online news, I can affirm that the public may not be fully informed of the reality in Libya and the dark side of one of the most complex ‘Arab Spring’ revolts.  Continue reading

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America, anthropology, bin-Laden, Bush, Ethnic Minorities, Europe, Iraq, Islam, Islam in Europe, Islamo Fascism, Islamophobia, jihad, Middle East, Muslims, Politics, Religion, Robert Spencer

What was Osama bin-Laden for Muslims?

bin-Laden is dead. A decadent symbol has been assassinated. For some time before his demise, his influence on contemporary terrorism had been on the wane. Most likely Osama had little choice but to agree to retire to his Pakistani prison under the ‘supervision’ of the Pakistani secret services and Taliban tribes.  I did not write any blog post at the time of bin-Laden’s execution. There was nothing to say. His story has had the feel of a work of fiction from beginning to end, complete with impressive pyrotechnics, blood and splatter, where the director, producer and star of the drama was none other than bin-Laden himself. He died as he wished: one bullet in the chest, a few stumbling steps, and a final gore splattering bullet in the head. Continue reading

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