From the Taliban to the Taliban: the case of Sayed Perwiz Kambakhsh


Why did our European and US governments invade Afghanistan? How many of us can recall the general rhetoric of a Just War fought in the name of an ‘Enduring Freedom’ to liberate Afghan women from their burqa and Afghan men from their long beards, as well as bringing to justice bin-Laden? The Afghan campaign has been a half military success, with US and Nato generals blaming each other for the other half failure, while bin-Laden, if not dead by natural cause, can celebrate Bush’s most evident flop. The Afghan war, while facilitating a new form of old corruption in the cities and capital, has increased the suffering of the rural population, often caught in battles of which they are only the victims. Yet some say that Afghanistan is now a better place since it is on the route toward democracy, though a fictional and corrupted one.

In the country the reality is quite dramatic, with an increased number of Afghan families relying on the cultivation of Opium, which Nato forces tolerate to avoid reinforcing the Taliban insurgence with new alienated and angered, desperate people. Indeed the Taliban and their allies, as one respondent, who visited the country told me, pay their ‘seekers of paradise’, many of which are ready to fight for gaining their family bread, and in case of death, there is still paradise (in other words a ‘Pascal’s Wager’).

Therefore, Nato and the US have decided to adopt less drastic measures than the Taliban did, with the result that today Afghanistan has an unprecedented record in the production of Opium. This is not the only negative side effect that Afghans have faced since their liberation. Today the country has for the first time seen people dying of HIV as well as experienced what people there often define as ‘western diseases’, prostitution and alcohol.

Of course, when people have more freedom, things can go wrong. Nobody, other than a blind minority, could, or can, consider the Taliban regime, with their unorthodox, tribal, interpretation of Islam an acceptable solution to social and political illness. Liberal Democracy, albeit suffering today a considerable and dangerous populist drift, remains the best system we currently have.

Afghanistan now is considered a democratic country, collaborating with the West for a secure future. The European Community is assisting the Afghan government in the process of building a tolerant democracy. Italy has accepted the challenge of helping the Afghan government to rebuilt its legal system.

Bombs, destruction, resistance, insurgency, counter insurgency, terrorism, corruption, sufferance are high prices that the ordinary Afghan people are paying for a better future and the ‘de-Talibanization’ of their country. However, we have now to ask how much support has the de-Talibanization. The reality is that the honeymoon with western democracy and values is ending every day more and more; the Taliban granted something that we cannot offer, other than betraying those same values we seem ready to spread even with bombs.

Sometimes, in fact, we forget that our liberties, freedom of speech, freedom of political action, freedom thought and freedom of creed comes, like a powerful medicine, with dramatic side effects; the worst of which is lack of security and social instability. The new ‘democracies’ are not the only ones to ponder advantages and disadvantages. Today old Europe seems ready to give up much of the liberal freedom that we have paid for with the blood of millions of Europeans.

However, Europe, or at least some of the European countries, such as the UK, took centuries to develop its own tailored form of liberal (sometimes monarchic) democracies. Since 2001 the US and Europe wished to provide Afghanistan with western tailored versions. The corrupted Afghan government, feigning innovation while maintaining Afghan warlord tradition, is losing even the last hopes of being seen as legitimate by its own people.

The truth is that without the sophisticated alchemy of warlords, opium traders, and Islamic charlatan-clerics, Afghanistan would witness an acclaimed return of the Taliban and Mullah Omar. The reason is simple: it is better to suffer under one single band of violent fanatics than hundreds of them. Furthermore, as an Afghan respondent told me ‘at least [under the Taliban] we may still be under the illusion that deprivations and hardship are for the benefit of Islam and our soul’.

Has the Afghan society changed since the Nato and US forces sent the Taliban back to the mountains from where their fight against the Russians started? If we leave aside the degrading effects of the War and the increasing differentiation between rich people in the cities and poor in the outskirts and villages, not very much has changed for the better for the ordinary afghan people.

Afghanistan, the Afghanistan which European and US politicians discuss, blaming only the insurgence and Taliban for the difficulties people suffer, is a masquerade. The demonstration? Sayed Perwiz Kambakhsh, an Afghan journalist sentenced to death for downloading material from the Internet relating to the role of women in Islamic societies. We do not know what he was looking for, but it was material linked to the condition of women in Islam. I am sure that as an Afghan who spent time under the misogynist Taliban regime, he must have had legitimate questions about it.

Karzai’s government lacks even the attempt to respect basic fundamental freedom of speech and the Afghan government’s clear fear to upset Talibanish Islamic judges shows the incredible masquerade that the US and Europe is ready to accept about Afghanistan. Yet today we can read that David Satterfield, America’s Co-ordinator for Iraq, sees Afghanistan as the real failure of the forced democratisation of a country, what he calls ‘the bad war’. Maybe we have just uplifted another masque, the one which covered the real interest behind the invasion of this tormented country.

It was a war of propaganda, a war which could have facilitated the acceptance of the real interest of Bush’s administration: Iraq and the redesigning of the Middle East. The hope of Afghan people and Sayed Perwiz Kambakhsh’s rights (and possibly life) were never the real reason for the war.

I hope that many of you may consider to take part in Reporters sans frontières’ initiative to have the death sentence quashed, to have all the charges against him withdrawn and to have him released.

Gabriele

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20 thoughts on “From the Taliban to the Taliban: the case of Sayed Perwiz Kambakhsh

  1. Dear Gabriele,
    I did not expect that at some point I could completely agree with some articles you write. But this article seems to be the case.

    It seems to me that one of the main causes of failure of Afghan democracy is the article 130 of Afghan constitution (written under US supervision ) under which Kambakhsh was sentenced. This reflects the deep ignorance of the real Islam on the part of those US “enforcers of democracy.” No one seems to be was ever interested in understanding what the article 130 that stipulates provisions for shariya law imply in the real world.
    Should we allow people as Rasheed Gonzalez to have their ways with shariya, we may get similar cases right in UK or Canada.
    ciao,
    neoneo

  2. Dear neoneo,

    thanks for your comment. As you know, I do not think that there is a single, unitary ‘shariya law’ in itself, since there are so many interpretations.

    I can only note that the Afghan legal system is still very much influenced by the need to ‘please’ both the Warlords as well as certain clerics who, on the one hand sentence people to death, while on the other are quite happy to let people grow opium poppies to fund ‘suicide’ operations. But this perhaps will be for another post.

    By the way, I invite my readers to take part in Reporters sans frontières’ initiative to have the death sentence quashed, to have all the charges against him withdrawn and to have him released.

    Best wishes
    Gabriele

  3. Should we allow people as Rasheed Gonzalez to have their ways with shariya, we may get similar cases right in UK or Canada.

    neoneo, I find that highly unlikely, mainly because it’s obvious you don’t really have a clue what the sharî’ah is. The case clearly has more to do with what Doc Marranci observes, than what you think it does. As mentioned in the RSF.org link provided in the post, “his arrest is linked to articles written by his brother, Sayed Yaqub Ibrahimi, criticising the Balkh provincial authorities.”

    Doc, how effective do you think these types of petitions are? Also, I was curious to get more of your thoughts concerning what you said above in your post, “The reason is simple: it is better to suffer under one single band of violent fanatics than hundreds of them.” Islamically, it’s forbidden to change an evil if the result is an equal or greater evil than that which exists (ref: Ibn Taimiyyah’s al-Amr bil-Ma’ruf wan-Nahy ‘anil-Munkar); looking at what’s gone on in Afghanistan, and in Iraq as well, one can see perfect examples of why.

    I’m also curious as to why the implied change with respect to the illusions mentioned by the Afghan respondent. If these illusions stemmed from beliefs they had while under Taliban rule, why would that change under this new government?

  4. Rasheed wrote: “I find that highly unlikely, mainly because it’s obvious you don’t really have a clue what the sharî’ah is.”

    Rahseed, the accusation of ignorance is standard in the beginning of every Muslim’s discourse with non-Muslim and is almost always ridiculous. In your case it is ridiculous because yourself provided me with the clues sufficient to count you as apologist of barbarity and an enemy of the Western value system. Even if I did not know about Pakistan’s blasphemy laws:
    http://www.rationalistinternational.net/Shaikh/blasphemy_laws_in_pakistan.htm ,

    Even if I did not know about Afghanistan’s handling of cases apostasy of Abdul Rahman according to “man baddala dînahu faqtalūhu.” (Thanks for providing the spelling of it) and the one we have been discussing right now you personally gave me some clues, when you wrote:

    “Yes, the Sharî’ah dictates that the apostate should be executed as a punishment, that certain convictions for crimes have lashing, stoning, and the cutting of limbs legislated as punishments. However, what you don’t seem to understand is that especially with regards to legislated punishments, these things are dealt with by the authorities, not by commoners.”

    These two sentences alone puts your in one basket with those who sentenced Kambakhsh to death, even if you disagree with this particular ruling (may be because he just did not wrote the paper himself) as some (presumably non-salafi) scholars disagree with the ruling. And I am certain you do not feel guilt due to this association with those Afghan practitioners of shariya which I would feel if I were you. “You see, this all is the matter of Islamic state” and this should remove all moral burden from your shoulders, even though your are the one who is supporting the Islamic state run by those shariya rules.

    Dear Gabriele,
    You wrote “As you know, I think that there is a single, unitary ’shariya law’ in itself, since there are so many interpretations.” Did you mean “I do not think?”

    I would agree that there are secular Muslims who would abhore the death penalty for blasphemy, but those have nothing to do with shariya. I have an opinion that there are 8 school of islamic jurispundence (shariya): the Hanafi school, the Maliki school, the Shafi’i the Hanbali school, less prominent are the Thahiri, Sufian Al’thawree, Sufian bin O’yayna, Layth bin Sa’ad. And those all agree that apostasy is punishable by death(for men). I am not sure that all would agree that blasphemy is a kind of apostasy and blasphemy must be alwase be punished by death. If you are aware of any school that does not stipulate death penalty for blasphemy, please let me know, I think it would be an important exception.

    Best Wishes,
    neoneo

  5. Rahseed, the accusation of ignorance is standard in the beginning of every Muslim’s discourse with non-Muslim and is almost always ridiculous. In your case it is ridiculous because yourself provided me with the clues sufficient to count you as apologist of barbarity and an enemy of the Western value system.

    neoneo, if someone displays a sufficient level of knowledge regarding what he’s speaking about, I won’t accuse such a person of ignorance. I’m pretty fair when it comes to such things. You on the otherhand display the worst type of ignorance: compound ignorance. You’re a person who doesn’t know, yet thinks he does. This following statement of yours just highlights that fact:

    These two sentences alone puts your in one basket with those who sentenced Kambakhsh to death, even if you disagree with this particular ruling (may be because he just did not wrote the paper himself) as some (presumably non-salafi) scholars disagree with the ruling. And I am certain you do not feel guilt due to this association with those Afghan practitioners of shariya which I would feel if I were you. “You see, this all is the matter of Islamic state” and this should remove all moral burden from your shoulders, even though your are the one who is supporting the Islamic state run by those shariya rules.

    F.y.i., according to what I’ve read mentioned in the links Dr. Marranci provided, Kambakhsh shouldn’t be put to death. I fail to see how “downloading an article that analyses what the Koran says about women” can warrant such a sentence, even if he was the one who wrote the article in the first place, which doesn’t even seem to be the case.

    Btw, why should I feel guilty for actions I haven’t committed or things that I’m not even responsible for?

  6. Dear Neoneo,

    opsss, thanks for spotting my typos of course it was ‘I do not think…’ I have made the correction :-)

    By the way, I find interesting the contemporary usage of the label ‘secular’ Muslim as well as ‘secular Jew’. I also have to note that we do not use the term ‘secular Buddhist’, secular ‘Christian’ or a ‘secular Sikh’. I think that an interesting reading on the conception of the ‘secular’ is Talal Asad ‘s book Formations of the Secular: Christianity, Islam, Modernity

    Best wishes
    Gabriele

  7. Pingback: Religion: The Cause of All Violence? « Rasheed Gonzales

  8. Rasheed

    Btw, why should I feel guilty for actions I haven’t committed or things that I’m not even responsible for?

    Neoneo: Because you espouse the main principle which motivated those action: “man baddala dînahu faqtalūhu.”
    I do not know though, if your also believe that the blasphemy made by a Muslim is a kind of apostasy.

    Rasheed: if someone displays a sufficient level of knowledge regarding what he’s speaking about, I won’t accuse such a person of ignorance.

    neoneo: Interestingly, I have heard ccusation of ignorance of people like Alis Sina (who can freely talk to Ayatollahs about Islam) and Robert Spencer (whom I never seen to be caught making factual error) coming from almost illiterate folks who judging by their writings were converted to Islam somewhere in prison where they served a term most probably for burglary. (I trust your are certanly not any of those)

    The fact is that for your Muslims, either educated or not, ignorance is merely disbelief or unwillingness to accept tenets of Islam. In this sense a half literate prison convert to Islam following his mullah is less ignorant than Craig and Watson (fyi; those two atheists discovered DNA) or Dawkins. And on the contrary, whatever comes from your books Quran and Hadit (as they interpreted in your denomination) your call knowledge, however counterfactual and ignorant (from Western standpoint) it sounds.

    Let us make an empirical test of the last proposition on your, Rasheed, if you would like it. Would you be so kind as to help me out to better understand your mindset and to answer a couple of questions:

    (1) Can your name any critic of Islam who is not ignorant according to you? ( I presume that the answer is a big resounding no :-) ???)

    (2) Was Ibn Baz, (once the head of Saudi salafi denomination) ignorant when he issued fatwa that Earth is flat, and beliving the opposte is apostasy? (I presume that he was not, he just uttered wisdom which is too subtle for an infidel to understand, which if translated correctly from Arabic tells just the opposite “Earth is round and is rotating around Sun ” :-) ????)

    thanks, neoneo

  9. Gabriele wrote:
    just a curiosity: what does it mean ‘from Western standpoint’? I really do not see any unitary ‘west’ and even geographically speaking it depends very much from which part of the world you are standing up

    neoneo:
    Deer Gabriele, I do agree that we have much differences even in the West. It is possible that even the idea that Earth is round is not shared by all people who associate themselves with what we call “the West.” To be more precise I should have said “from standpoint of an educated person”, or “from secular standpoint” rather than “from Western standpoint.”

    In fact you do not have to be Westerner to agree with those scientific facts. And on the other hand, you can be in the West and believe in lunacies, just as uneducated people from tribal societies in Arabia or India believe in lunacies. we have some in the West plenty of people who would not agree with scientific facts. For example the doctrine of socialy constructed gender is taught in departments of Women Studies in US, however inconsistent it is with genetics. The adherence to rational thinking is again a matter of statistics.

    What I wanted to say is that there are some basic scientific facts which none of the educated people would challenge. E.g.(1)Earth is round, (2) menstruation is not a women decease as Muhammad said , but a natural process, (3) sperm is not produced in men’s bones as Quran says. I presume that it is safe to call “ignorant” anyone who would say no to those things and thios is most appropriate use of the English word ‘ignorant.”

    I think that even Rasheed, however strong ties he has to slafist culture would shrug from statement “Earth is flat,” for he is likely to be an educated person. But as most religious people he would probably fall short of suggesting that Ibn Baz was an “ignorant person” whose mind was blinded by the darkness of Islam. What he will say is that it is all too subtle for an infidel to understand, you do not know the context, you can’t read Arabic. And, the only reason you argue against the words of Allah is your ignorance. This mental trick allows him to continue with his believe in the words of allah however irrational they sound to the rest of the world.

  10. Because you espouse the main principle which motivated those action: “man baddala dînahu faqtalūhu.”

    Hogwash. In Islam, we have this belief, «No bearer of burdens will bear the burden of another.» Each individual will be held accountable for what he himself does.

    In relation to this case, Kambakhsh did not apostate from Islam. Thus, the law derived from the hadîth you quote is inapplicable. As for the charge against him of blasphemy, then according to what’s been presented here, he doesn’t seem to be guilty of anything that would warrant the sentence he was given. In fact, I’d even say it seems as if he’s being oppressed.

    So, neoneo, would you mind telling me once more why I should feel guilty?

    (I trust your are certanly not any of those)

    Not that it’s any of your business, or even of any relevance to the discussion, f.y.i. I have never set foot inside of a prison, let alone convert in one.

    (1) Can your name any critic of Islam who is not ignorant according to you? ( I presume that the answer is a big resounding no ???)

    Yes, I can. But if by “critic” you specifically refer to people like Spencer, Sina, Beck, et al., then your presumption is correct. No.

    However, true Orientalist scholars like Muir, Goldziher, Watt, Margoliouth, etc., who I do consider critics of Islam to a certain degree, were far from being ignorant about the things they wrote and spoke about pertaining to Islam; wrong about certain things, perhaps, but not ignorant.

    (2) Was Ibn Baz, (once the head of Saudi salafi denomination) ignorant when he issued fatwa that Earth is flat, and beliving the opposte is apostasy? (I presume that he was not, he just uttered wisdom which is too subtle for an infidel to understand, which if translated correctly from Arabic tells just the opposite “Earth is round and is rotating around Sun ” ????)

    Yet another display of your ignorance. Perhaps it would benefit you to do some actual research and verification as to what was actually said regarding this issue. Wikipedia might be a good place to start for you.

  11. Cheers Gabriele.

    I noted your post on my blog and followed it back to your site. Very interesting, relevant content. A quick question: Is Afghanistan just an unfinished civil war that’s on temporary hiatus while the US and NATO tinker with the countryside? It strikes me that the Taliban are the Pashtun “home team” and, being divided between Pakistan and Afghanistan have no need to go anywhere. They are the burr under Karzai’s saddle.

    I don’t understand why we think we need to train Afghanis in the art of warfare. From what I’ve read, they’re already masters of the craft. Do you believe that the departure of the Westerners would guarantee a return to Taliban domination? Also, do you have any information on residual ties between units of the Afghan army and their ethnic militias?

    Regards

    The Mound of Sound

  12. Dear Roberto,

    First of all, accept my apologies for the late reply, since your comment was originally posted on the 26th of January. I was travelling and I could not reply in full to your comments thorough my pocket PC.
    I find your observations interesting and I will try to tell you what I know about it, though I am not an expert on Afghanistan and never conducted fieldwork there.

    You have asked:

    Is Afghanistan just an unfinished civil war that’s on temporary hiatus while the US and NATO tinker with the countryside?

    I really do not know whether we may speak of ‘Afghan civil’ war. Afghanistan has ever been controlled and divided among powerful warlords. This is the reality. The ‘Taliban’ though formed principally by Pashto speakers, succeed in using religion, ‘Islam’, to provide an unprecedented unity among several ‘warlords’ Pashto-speaking, while fighting the Soviet Union invasion.
    An interesting book that can help to understand the complex reality during the end of 1980s and the 1990s Taliban victory over the Russian army is Olivier Roy Islam and Resistance in Afghanistan.

    Surly, the situation after 2001 is much more fragmented. We have to remember, and few really do so, that Karzai is a member of Popalzai tribe, which supported the Talibanization of Afghanistan, though he felt that the influence of the Mullah Omar was too strong, in particular when bin-Laden arrived with his Arab militia. The Taliban, nonetheless, named Karzai United Nations ambassador. Hence, we must be clear: Karzai did not disagree with the ‘Taliban’ over the kind of Islam they were proposing to establish, but the methodology with which Afghanistan had to be ‘Islamicised’ (i.e. the issue of Arab influence and the anti-tribe view that the Arab-militias had).
    Today we can say that there is a fracture between what was the Taliban movement. One the one side there are those who reject the influence of Al-Qaida; on the other, those how reject the idea that collaborating with the West can being back a real, modern, Islamic state, not less Taliban than the first one, however just more ‘legalistic’ in its formality so that the .

    You then asked

    Do you believe that the departure of the Westerners would guarantee a return to Taliban domination?

    Well, Roberto, if I am right in what I have speculated above, I think that the answer is no, because the ‘Taliban’, though now divided again in different factions, are in power just now. It is only for political reasons, that I am sure you can guess, that we do not call them ‘Taliban’ when they are governing Kabul. The issues here is not the Taliban, but actually the Arab militia and Pakistani influence in the North of the territory and Iran in the South (see Barnett R. Rubin 2002).

    I have the impression that the US and Europe would not object too much if Afghanistan go back to a ‘moderate’ Karzai’s Taliban style, but of course Karzai is very conscious that bin-Laden militia are paying the poor tribes of the North so to continues a useless war by-proxy with the US and the NATO forces. The issue is that Karzai is not trusted by the tribes in the North and has not real money to buy the unemployed young people. Moreover, the US and NATO has some interested in keeping the fight on, even though is it practically useless in itself.

    Finally you asked,

    Do you have any information on residual ties between units of the Afghan army and their ethnic militias?

    Yes, I think that there are strong links. It is inevitable and the NATO and US forces, though I think they were very much unprepared for it, now know that this is the reality. Does a national ‘Afghan Army’ make sense? Well, until the level of unemployment remains high, young people probably (if the risk is not too high) may consider opting for the Afghan Army because of their financial issues and remaining loyal. With few exceptions, in my opinion, many of the military Afghan officers are not there for the nation, but as a kind of ‘mercenaries’ for the state instead of a particular warlord. So, you can see the issue here. Finally, I think that a look at the tribe and clan divisions can provide you with a clear idea of the complexity of the situation.

    Best wishes
    Gabriele

  13. Rasheed, Thanks for answering my questions. You are an almost perfect fit. Yes, sure if I were not ignorant I would not said all that about ibn Baz. FYI: The article from where I learned about Ibn Baz http://www.islam-watch.org/SujitDas/MuslimGenius.htm has all what wiki has. The way your react on this controversy, the way followers of Ibn Baz were handling it (according to wiki) reflects the essence of Islamic mind. If you got into embarrassment then blame others in ignorance or in telling lies. And since infidels do not know Arabic you can always say that Ibn Baz was a follower of ibn Taymiyyah who did not believe that earth is flat and actually he has known in 13th century , long before Magellan that the Earth is round. Bingo! You put all those ignorant infidels in shame! How smart we Muslims are and how stupid infidels are!
    On the other hand , as an Islamic scholar you may be interested in collection of Quranic verses which may stipulate that earth is flat, here they are all on one page: http://khalas.wordpress.com/2007/03/01/a-flat-earth-the-islamic-perspective/

    Rasheed wrote: In relation to this case, Kambakhsh did not apostate from Islam. Thus, the law derived from the hadîth you quote is inapplicable.

    Neoneo: Well I said I am not sure that hudud of blasphemy is a consequence of hudud of apostasy. Even if they are not related so what? there were other cases I mentioned, what do you say about Abdul Rahman , Rasheed? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abdul_Rahman_(convert) You have suggested that apostates have to be executed and adulterers have to be stoned. There can be many cases like this. What would you say to all those victims of Islamic jurisprudence whose crimes only are apostasy or adultery? Look at this woman: http://askew.blogharbor.com/_NewPhotos/stoning.jpg You are the one who approve all these, and moreover wants to bring it to England.

    Rasheed wrote: So, neoneo, would you mind telling me once more why I should feel guilty?
    Neoneo:. I said “ I would feel shame if I were you..,” but this does not mean that you would feel shame or guilt in the same situation, for we are not the same. I do not think a Muslim can feel shame in principle, if they do, they blow up, or kill their daughters or kill someone who made them to feel it.

    I too wanted to convert to Islam, but when I read the verse “ Unlawful to you all women except those whom are your wifes and those whom your right hand posseses…” and looked up in modern commentaries what does “those whom your right hand possesses” mean. And I thought that Islam is not for me. Now I feel shame that I merely said “Islam is not for me” and did not make an ethical judgment. I should have clearly said that Islam is evil. Now I thank God I can do it and say looking at the evil, that well, it is an evil.

    Your on the other hand, if you can read about all these killings of infidels and raping women and stoning of adulterers and killing of apostates and relate to it personally and do not see any evil in it will never feel shame or guilt. If you were one who has not read it (as many Muslim did not read it) it were another story. But it seems you did and you do not feel shame of being associated with death for apostacy or death for adultery.

    What I can tell you Rasheed, if you have no human soul and no hart? I think we belong to differnt species of man. I think I have said enough. Immigration authorities will soon handle your case and send you and all alike to the hell where you belong. Thanks to people like Ali Sina and Spencer the day will come when everyone will know for what you stand, and then not only few people like I, but everyone will deeply hate you and all the evil for which you stand. Then what was done to nazi parties worldwide will be done to the salfi movement. Give it few years. But if, God forbid, your collegues with differnt phylosophical view on jihad blow up a wmd here it can happen much erler.

    neoneo

  14. Dear Neoeno and Rasheed

    I see that both of you are going again off topic.

    I remind you that the blog is not a forum or a space for priviate discussion.

    As you can understand, a forum will be more appropriated for this kind of discussions, than comments to a post.

    Yet if you wish to discuss about the specific case of the post or the situation in Afghanistan, you are very welcomed.

    Best wishes
    Gabriele

  15. Doc, my apologies. I had no intention of making this a private discussion between myself and neoneo and am trying to avoid doing so.

    Btw, I’m still interested in your thoughts concerning the things I asked about back in comment #3.

    neoneo, if you want to continue your attempts, feel free to contact me through the email address I’ve mentioned on my blog. I’d be glad to reply to your last comment posted here, if you wish to take the discussion that route.

  16. Dear Prof. Marranci. I respect your policy about comments and it is in no way my intention to continue the discussion (which is why I have not responded to the other statements made by neoneo). I just wanted to point out some things that were clearly false.

    Rasheed wrote: So, neoneo, would you mind telling me once more why I should feel guilty?
    Neoneo:. I said “ I would feel shame if I were you..,”

    Actually you said exactly what you were accused of saying. As per post 4:

    And I am certain you do not feel guilt due to this association with those Afghan practitioners of shariya which I would feel if I were you.

    Look at this woman: http://askew.blogharbor.com/_NewPhotos/stoning.jpg

    Look at this video (particularly at 0.50 min). The picture is a fake, an outrageous one at that, considering how it was used in the video.

    You are the one who approve all these, and moreover wants to bring it to England.

    Actually, as per his “My Story” section on his blog, he was born and raised in Canada:

    “Before Islam, I was born into a Christian family and baptised a Protestant (of the United Church of Canada). My mom and dad (may Allah guide them both) are originally from the Philippines, but my two younger brothers (one of whom accepted Islam two years prior to me and may Allah guide the other one as well) and I were born and raised in Toronto, Canada.”

    Immigration authorities will soon handle your case and send you and all alike to the hell where you belong.

    Refer above.

  17. “Yet if you wish to discuss about the specific case of the post or the situation in Afghanistan, you are very welcomed.”

    Dear Gabriele,
    I did not realize, I did not assume that the gist of the problem you were considering in your article is all about Afghanistan local conditions, rather than about the causes of what happened in Afghanistan. Do not we have very similar cases in Iran and Pakistan? Should we assume that death sentence for blasphemy in Afghanistan your discuss and death sentence for blasphemy e.g. in Pakistan happen because of different political reasons? If you think so, than that would completely surprise me. I thought that it is all about shariya and those who practice it in Afghanistan and I thought that our discussion of shariya with Rasheed is actually most relevant to what happened in Afghanistan (and happens in Iran and Pakistan and soon may come to UK :-)

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/7232661.stm

    In any case as I said in my previous post, I have nothing to say further, I already said enough. If death for blasphemy, stoning for adultery are the provisions of shariya which our “moderate” correspondent Rasheed advocates and do not feel shame about advocating those things, than Immigration authorities should handle his case, not I. I do not think it is matter if Rasheed lives in Canada or UK. In both countries shariya is not welcome. Interestingly, besides of local “islamophobes” like I, who hate shariya, in both countries there are respective moderate Muslim communities which clearly understand that Shariya is abomination, and they too will fight with it:

    http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/yasmin-alibhai-brown/yasmin-alibhaibrown-what-he-wishes-on-us-is-an-abomination-780186.html

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